A Toast to Toast

Don’t overlook this hip-to-humble brunch staple.

Story and photos By Megan Wagstaff

I love a good huevos rancheros to get my weekend going, but the breakfast food that will forever have my heart is toast. Possibly the humblest of ways to begin the day, keeping company with the likes of unassuming oatmeal and black coffee, toast is the David to brunch’s Goliath.

Sure, there are glamorous versions of toast, like The 9 to 5 at The Rose Establishment (235 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-208-5569, TheRoseEstb.com), all dolled up with smashed avocado, roasted radicchio, black truffle potato chips, pecorino fiore sardo, pea shoots, olive oil and fleur de sel (throw in a soft boiled egg for good measure). I can’t blame these fancy toasts for trying to steal a slice of the breakfast spotlight. They pull it off marvelously.

Then there’s toast that’s just different enough to remind you you’re not eating at home. I’m referring to Publik Coffee Roasters (975 S. West Temple, SLC, 801-355-3161, PublikCoffee.com) and their lineup of toast, which includes toppings you’re used to, like jam, honey and peanut butter, taken up a notch with the addition of ingredients like brie, apples and hummus.

Weekends at home call for slices of Salt Lake Sourdough from Bread Riot Bakehouse (801-252-5022, BreadRiotBakehouse.com). Find their loaves at Liberty Heights Fresh, Caputo’s and the Downtown Farmers Market.

I top mine with lots of Kerrygold Irish butter and homemade peach rosemary jam, (see recipe below). There’s nothing quite as comforting as these slightly chewy, tangy bites, balanced with creamy butter melted in all the airy pockets created by the natural yeast of a sourdough starter. It’s my go-to indulgence when I want to stay in my pajamas and spend the morning with a crossword puzzle and a coffee.

Sure, there are glamorous versions of toast, like The 9 to 5 at The Rose Establishment (235 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-208-5569, TheRoseEstb.com), all dolled up with smashed avocado, roasted radicchio, black truffle potato chips, pecorino fiore sardo, pea shoots, olive oil and fleur de sel (throw in a soft boiled egg for good measure). I can’t blame these fancy toasts for trying to steal a slice of the breakfast spotlight. They pull it off marvelously.

Then there’s toast that’s just different enough to remind you you’re not eating at home. I’m referring to Publik Coffee Roasters (975 S. West Temple, SLC, 801-355-3161, PublikCoffee.com) and their lineup of toast, which includes toppings you’re used to, like jam, honey and peanut butter, taken up a notch with the addition of ingredients like brie, apples and hummus.

Weekends at home call for slices of Salt Lake Sourdough from Bread Riot Bakehouse (801-252-5022, BreadRiotBakehouse.com). Find their loaves at Liberty Heights Fresh, Caputo’s and the Downtown Farmers Market.

I top mine with lots of Kerrygold Irish butter and homemade peach rosemary jam, (see recipe below). There’s nothing quite as comforting as these slightly chewy, tangy bites, balanced with creamy butter melted in all the airy pockets created by the natural yeast of a sourdough starter. It’s my go-to indulgence when I want to stay in my pajamas and spend the morning with a crossword puzzle and a coffee.

Sure, there are glamorous versions of toast, like The 9 to 5 at The Rose Establishment (235 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-208-5569, TheRoseEstb.com), all dolled up with smashed avocado, roasted radicchio, black truffle potato chips, pecorino fiore sardo, pea shoots, olive oil and fleur de sel (throw in a soft boiled egg for good measure). I can’t blame these fancy toasts for trying to steal a slice of the breakfast spotlight. They pull it off marvelously.

Then there’s toast that’s just different enough to remind you you’re not eating at home. I’m referring to Publik Coffee Roasters (975 S. West Temple, SLC, 801-355-3161, PublikCoffee.com) and their lineup of toast, which includes toppings you’re used to, like jam, honey and peanut butter, taken up a notch with the addition of ingredients like brie, apples and hummus.

Weekends at home call for slices of Salt Lake Sourdough from Bread Riot Bakehouse (801-252-5022, BreadRiotBakehouse.com). Find their loaves at Liberty Heights Fresh, Caputo’s and the Downtown Farmers Market.

I top mine with lots of Kerrygold Irish butter and homemade peach rosemary jam, (see recipe below). There’s nothing quite as comforting as these slightly chewy, tangy bites, balanced with creamy butter melted in all the airy pockets created by the natural yeast of a sourdough starter. It’s my go-to indulgence when I want to stay in my pajamas and spend the morning with a crossword puzzle and a coffee.

I top mine with lots of Kerrygold Irish butter and homemade peach rosemary jam, (see recipe below). There’s nothing quite as comforting as these slightly chewy, tangy bites, balanced with creamy butter melted in all the airy pockets created by the natural yeast of a sourdough starter. It’s my go-to indulgence when I want to stay in my pajamas and spend the morning with a crossword puzzle and a coffee.

Peach Rosemary Jam
A better balance of sweet and savory than regular peach jam, this herbaceous blend is also amazing with cheese and charcuterie. Makes 3.5 pints

Ingredients
4 cups peaches
¼ cup fresh lime juice
1 teaspoon lime zest
2 sprigs of rosemary
1 package (1.75 ounces) pectin
5 cups sugar

Process
Peel, pit, and chop the peaches. For easier peeling, place peaches in boiling water for 30 seconds, remove with a slotted spoon, and immediately put peaches in an ice water bath. Note: if you prefer smoother jam, puree peaches with an immersion blender.

Bring peaches and next 4 ingredients to a rolling boil, stir constantly for 1 minute. Add in sugar. Bring back up to a rolling boil, stir constantly for 1 minute.

Remove jam from heat. Discard rosemary sprigs and skim off any foam.

Pour jam into hot, sterilized canning jars (I use half-pint jars). Leave ¼ inch of room at the top of each jar.

Using a small spatula, work your way around the inside of each jar to remove air bubbles.

Wipe the mouth of each jar, place on lids and screw on canning bands.

Fully immerse jars in a boiling water bath. Process for 10 minutes. Remove carefully and let rest on the counter. Don’t press the lids; as the jam cools, the lids should all fully seal (you might hear them popping as they vacuum closed).

If any of the jam lids haven’t formed an airtight sealed overnight, put in the fridge and use as soon as possible. The rest of your jam will be good for up to two years.

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